closeup of infrared camera technology

12News Now: Coronavirus puts Beaumont company's infrared cameras in high demand

12News recently featured Infrared Cameras Inc about the company's efforts to slow down the spread of coronavirus. Read a highlight here: Southeast Texas is taking center stage in the fight against the coronavirus as a Beaumont company's infrared cameras are now in high-demand. Infrared Cameras Incorporated, which has been in around since 1995, makes the cameras which have varied uses including electrical thermography, process control as well as medical uses. Recently sales for cameras for medical use have spiked in response to the coronavirus according to CEO Gary Strahan. The sensitive scientific cameras can measure the surface temperatures of people and the readings can help doctors determine how to treat patients according to Strahan. "We're building these cameras as fast as we can. We have millions of purchase orders right now in little Beaumont, Texas. We're building cameras to put them out around the world to stop the spread of this infectious disease," Strahan said. The full press release can be found here.
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March 10, 2020
infrared image of man

News Release: ICI Steps Up to Prevent Spread of Coronavirus with Infrared Cameras and Report Building Software

BEAUMONT, Texas — Infrared Cameras Incorporated (ICI), manufactures P and S Series IR Cameras, which provide accurate skin surface temperature readings from the first 1/1000th inch of epidermal layer; another product, IR Flash Software version 1.0, visualizes this data and allows for report building functionalities. These devices and software are intended for adjunct use with other clinical diagnostic procedures to help curb the spread of infectious diseases. They can be used in hospitals, sub-acute healthcare settings, and public areas, i.e. airports, schools, etc. Devices are made to order in the USA. P and S-Series IR Cameras are paired with ICI's award-winning IR Flash Software version 1.0. This combo offers unmatched image quality and state-of-the-art radiometric accuracy while streaming real-time radiometric data directly to any desktop, laptop, or embedded system. Users can integrate the system with touchscreen devices and touch enabled monitors. Windows and Linux software, drivers and SDKs are available for custom applications. The full press release on ICI Steps Up to Prevent Spread of Coronavirus with Infrared Cameras and Report Building Software can be found here.
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March 10, 2020
Infrared camera increase demand

Dallas Business Journal: Texas camera company’s demand has ‘gone through the roof’ as it helps efforts against the coronavirus

The Dallas Business Journal wrote a feature about Infrared Cameras Inc.'s battle with coronavirus and efforts to fulfill the increased demand. Read the excerpt here, and check out the full article on the Journal's website. A small Texas company is seeing a surge in demand as it helps the world in its fight against the coronavirus. Beaumont's Infrared Cameras Inc. is providing gear that can help quickly identify people who might have fevers, giving countries a tool that can be paired with other tests to determine if someone has the coronavirus. The company develops and manufactures the products– and the technology-powered gear is stirring interest from places such as Africa and Asia, according to Gary Strahan, CEO of the company.

Between Jan. 1 and this week, ICI has sold more than 1,000 systems compared to an average of around 100 a month as demand climbs, he said.

“It’s gone through the roof,” Strahan said. “We’ve had explosive growth.”

READ MORE ON DALLAS BUSINESS JOURNAL >>
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March 6, 2020
ICI software detects skin temperature at a distance

Forbes: Tech That Scans People For Temperature In Big Demand Amid Coronavirus Crisis

Forbes interviewed CEO Gary Strahan about ICI's infrared cameras for medical use. Click here to read an excerpt of the article: Infrared Cameras Inc., a small private company in Beaumont, Texas, sells two high-temperature systems that are priced at $5,000 and $10,000. They require people to stand still facing the camera, with a reference object in the field of view called a “blackbody” that has a known level of infrared emissions. Founder Gary Strahan says he’s ramping up staffing and production after receiving an order for 230 systems from an individual customer two weeks ago and quoting prices to thousands of prospective buyers. They include a cruise ship operator, a private girls high school in Hong Kong and a manufacturer in China looking to add an infrared camera to a robot so that humans wouldn’t have to be exposed to someone suspected of having an illness. Strahan says some unscrupulous distributors are taking advantage of the high demand to sell thermal cameras designed for industrial use with a wide accuracy range of plus or minus 2 degrees Centigrade. “There are a lot of schleppers out there trying to make a buck on a pandemic.”   READ MORE ON FORBES >>
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March 6, 2020
infrared thermometer hostpot IR

New York Times: Demand for Infrared Thermometers Spikes Due to Coronavirus Outbreak

Infrared Cameras Inc CEO Gary Strahan was quoted in the New York Times discussing a spike in demand due to the coronavirus. Read the excerpt here: Thousands of miles from the heart of the outbreak, a small technology supplier in Beaumont, Texas, has also been feeling the crush of demand. The company, Infrared Cameras Inc, makes high-tech imaging equipment as well as infrared thermometers, which cost $25 apiece. In a normal month, the company sells about 100 infrared cameras, according to its chief executive, Gary Strahan. Since January, the company has sold more than 1,000, supplying schools, cruise ships, factories, offices, hospitals, and theaters in countries like China and South Korea. Mr. Strahan said he had been working every day from 4 a.m. to 10 p.m. to keep up with the orders. “It’s the most overwhelming thing I’ve had to deal with in my life,” he said. “We’ve got people coming to us directly, saying: ‘Can you supply 1,000 cameras? Can you supply 2,000 cameras?’” The company’s cameras and thermometer guns have a margin of error of 0.1 to 0.2 degrees Celsius, according to Mr. Strahan, who has been selling infrared cameras since the 1990's. But many products on the market are less reliable. Click here to read more on the New York Times. Click here to read more on Business Insider.
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March 4, 2020
Gary Strahan CEO of Infrared Cameras Inc CNN interview

Can a Camera Help Detect Ebola? - CNN Interview

Infrared cameras and software can help detect sick people based on body temperature. Gary Strahan, Founder of Infrared Cameras Inc., on CNN (August 4, 2014) discussing how ICI’s thermal imaging cameras and technological software may be used to limit a potentially infected person from spreading a viral infection, like Ebola, globally. Early symptoms of the Ebola virus include sudden onset of fever.
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July 24, 2015